September 18, 2014

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Teresa Armor

Teresa Armor is a Korean-American adoptee, who has been changing lives since her departure from foreign soil to the domestic American family setting, at the age of 2 1/2. As the current CEO, CFO, and Co-Founder of the Murrysville, PA non-profit, Armor Children, Inc., she's been instrumental in minimizing disputes among the organization's three subdivisions. These divisions often feud with each other over proprietary rights and in-house constitutional boundaries. In 2008 she was signficant in the acquisition of our male division, which grew Armor Children, Inc. from it's previous two female divisions, formed in 2002 and 2005, to three! When not busily manning the front lines at Armor Children, Inc. Teresa likes to get her sci-fi and horror on via literature, cinema, or any media which can be quickly obtained and absorbed in a day.

Teresa Armor

About Teresa Armor

Teresa Armor is a Korean-American adoptee, who has been changing lives since her departure from foreign soil to the domestic American family setting, at the age of 2 1/2. She is currently attending Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and plans to be ordained in the ELCA when finished with her studies.

Extreme Parenting: Why Every Parent May Be Categorized As Such

Time Magazine Are you Mom Enough Breastfeeding

There’s been a recent spate of news stories that has created some fervor lately.

First, there’s the breastfeeding mom who graced the cover of Time Magazine with her three (almost four) year-old son. Then there’s Stephanie Decker who lost her legs protecting her children during a monstrous tornado this past spring. There’s the anonymous mother from Miami who recently had to explain to police that her son was not a zombie, after he was shot and killed while attacking a homeless person and eating part of his face. Let’s also not forget Trayvon Martin’s parents who have to deal with their son’s death on a daily basis – and who is still not able to move forward while his murderer is yet to be convicted.

[Read more...]

Sacred Parenting (By Teresa Armor)

(By Teresa Armor - with references to the book Sacred Parenting by Gary L. Thomas)

One of the most important responsibilities we have as parents, yet might take lightly, is that of raising our children to know, love, and accept Jesus as our Lord and Savior. But just telling them about God, or even regularly attending worship isn’t enough. The Bible tells parents that we should, “[R]aise [our children] with Christian discipline and instruction.” (Ephesians 6:4). When each of my kids were baptized, some of the promises I made were to faithfully bring them to church, have them attend Sunday School, and eventually get confirmed. Until recently, I often felt overwhelmed (even frustrated) when I thought about this huge responsibility. Because of this, there were many times when I would avoid weekly worship services and some of the ministries I enjoyed.

It’s possible many of you reading this article may have felt something similar at one time or another. Maybe you also chose to sleep in on a Sunday morning, in lieu of going to worship. Maybe you have also sat bleary-eyed and oblivious to the lesson of the day in a church pew while your pastor sermonized. Maybe you have also watched other families who seem to have their act together on a Sunday morning and have prayed for the day when that might be you someday.
[Read more...]

Why Learning Korean is a Pain in the Butt – This Video may Help! (By Teresa Armor)

(By Teresa Armor) For me, learning any new language is complex. Most of the time, there’s a new alphabet and unfamiliar symbols with which one must acquaint oneself. Often there are different ways the mouth, tongue, and face must move in order to properly vocalize the new sounds and words – all of which are uncomfortable for one raised in a culture that welcomes convenience over discomfort.

That being said, I actually thought (really, really thought) that my Korean genes would kick in the minute I began to navigate the Korean language, for a second time. Yes, at one time I actually spoken Korean fluently. Albeit I was two – but I had known it, understood it, and spoken it well enough. So excuse my  naivete in thinking that when I decided to learn it again, as an adult, that I felt certain that something from my early childhood would come back to me (some sort of brain/tongue/ear muscle memory that would ease the pain of twenty plus years of non-use. Additionally, I will say that I thought for some reason that learning Korean would somehow make me more Korean – as if there is such a thing). [Read more...]

How Korean am I? (By Teresa Armor)

(By Teresa Armor) At the latest KAACP dinner, the notion of “How Korean Am I?” came up. For those of you unfamiliar with my recent article on KAACP, it’s the Korean Adult Adoptees of Central Pennsylvania. So the subject of “Korean-ism” might be foreign to those who grew up in traditionally Korean households, e.g. homes where parents, grandparents, and possibly aunts and uncles spoke, cooked, and lived Korean. Those of us adopted into culturally non-Korean homes cannot necessarily relate to how “All Koreans” are like this or that, or do this or that. My current joke, although it’s not really that funny, is that I’m not as Korean as I think I am. Physically, I can play the part, but what does it really mean to be Korean? How Korean am I really? Does it mean more than being born with these particular set of genes?

A wise and wonderful lady (that I’ve recently had the opportunity to get to know through the above mentioned dinners) had the following thoughts which I felt expressed the concept succinctly, yet eloquently. It is stated as follows:

My biological mother was Korean, and after a stay in an orphanage for the first ten months of my life (in 1950 due to her inability to properly care for me), I was adopted by a wonderful family in the U.S. When I look in the mirror, a Korean woman with short black hair, turquoise framed glasses, and a few wrinkles that expresses “I’ve experienced life,” reflects back at me. [Read more...]

What is Up with Non-Asians Thinking that Korean Women are Meek and Subservient? (By Teresa Armor)

(By Teresa Armor) In talking with many of my Asian and Korean girlfriends, we always exchange interesting anecdotes about our daily lives. There are the typical bits about one of us being stopped by strangers asking “Do we know So-n-So?” because this other So-n-So also happens to be of some non-descript Asian variety. But this doesn’t happen too often, at least not to me, at least not any more. I will admit that there are times when even I have a hard time telling us Asians apart. But that’s only after I’ve imbibed one too many, in a poorly lit room, without my glasses. Yes, it happens, but we tend to just laugh it off and get to tale spinning about other salacious ordeals.

Sometimes we share more sordid occurrences. Like the time a co-worker of mine thought it would be ok to caress my hair (at that time it was very long!) without my knowledge or consent. And then, when found out, tried to divert my attention with a story about beaver fur. I dreaded the possible connections! If you’re thinking the co-worker was a man you’re wrong, it was a woman. I don’t think she intended to be as creepy as she was, even considering her story about beaver fur, but I do know she didn’t want me to realize that she was infringing upon me and my hair’s personal boundaries. [Read more...]

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